International Assessment Applications of Emerging and Converging Technologies (NBIC 2)
              

         
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Study Coordinators

  Mike Roco, NSF
 

Dr. Roco is the founding chair of the National Science and Technology Council's subcommittee on Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology (NSET), and is the Senior Advisor for Nanotechnology at the National Science Foundation (NSF). He also coordinated the programs on academic liaison with industry (GOALI). Prior to joining NSF, he was Professor of mechanical and chemical engineering. He is credited with thirteen patents, contributed over two hundred and archival articles and in twenty books including "Particulate Two-phase Flow", “Converging Technologies: NBIC”, “Mapping Nanotechnology Knowledge and Innovation: Global and Longitudinal Patent and Literature Analysis”. Dr. Roco has been a member of several international research councils including the International Risk Governance Council in Geneva. He is a corresponding member of the Swiss Academy of Engineering Sciences, a Fellow of American Institute of Chemical Engineering, Fellow of American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Fellow of the Institute of Physics.

 

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  Bill Bainbridge  Bill Bainbridge, NSF

William Sims Bainbridge is an American sociologist who currently resides in Virginia. He is co-director of Human-Centered Computing at the National Science Foundation (NSF). He is the first Senior Fellow to be appointed by the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies. Bainbridge is most well known for his work on the sociology of religion. He has published extensively on the sociology of computer gaming, and he has pioneered the use of online virtual worlds for scientific conferences and research proposal review panels. He has edited two major reference works relevant to NBIC, The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction and Leadership in Science and Technology. His doctoral research and first book concerned the social movement dedicated to exploration of outer space, and he has returned to that topic for the book he is currently writing, examining the social and intellectual barriers to future progress in that direction

 

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Panel Chair



  George M. Whitesides, Harvard University
 

Research Interests
Physical and organic chemistry, materials science, biophysics, complexity and emergence, surface science, microfluidics, optics, self-assembly, micro- and nanotechnology, science for developing economies, catalysis, energy production and conservation, origin of life, rational drug design, cell-surface biochemistry, simplicity, and infochemistry.

 

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Panel Co-Chair



  Bruce E. Tonn, University of Tennessee
 

Research Interests
Dr. Tonn's researches focuses on environmental and energy policy, futures studies, sustainability, and policy decision making methods. His research interests also include uncertainty methods, technology policy, computers in society, and social theory.

 

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Panelists



 
  • Jian Cao, Northwestern University

    Research Interests
    Dr. Cao’s major research interests include the mechanics and instability analysis of deformation processes from micro to macro scale, material characterization of metals and woven composites, and machine/process innovation. Her work has made fundamental contributions to the understanding of wrinkling behavior in sheet metal forming and the effects of material microstructure and material architecture on forming processes. Her research has integrated analytical and numerical simulation methods, control and sensors to advance manufacturing processes. Current research on micro-forming, moldless forming (incremental forming) and laser processing has direct impacts on energy-efficient manufacturing. Her contributions have been recognized by honors and awards given by her peers in the field of manufacturing, applied mechanics and control. Her work has been funded both by government agencies and industries.

 

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  Mamadou Diallo Mamadou Diallo, Caltech and KAIST

Research Interests
My current research interests and program focus on the characterization and multiscale modeling of nanoparticles and colloids in natural and engineered environmental systems.  Environmentally relevant particles of interest consist of supramolecular assemblies with characteristic length scales of 1nm to 10 mm.  These include naturally occurring abiotic/biotic macromolecules, nanoparticles and colloids.  In natural environmental systems, fulvic acids, humic acids and their supramolecular aggregates have a significant impact on water quality.  They control contaminant mobility, reactivity and bioavailability in natural environmental systems.  Nanoparticles can also be designed and synthesized to act as (i) separation and reaction media for organic/inorganic pollutants and (ii) scaffolds and delivery vehicles for bioactive compounds; thus providing unprecedented opportunities to develop more efficient and cost effective water treatment processes.  The toxicity of anthropogenic chemicals depends to a large extent on their interactions with biological nanostructures such as proteins and DNA.  The fate, transport and toxicity of synthetic nanomaterials (e.g., carbon nanotubes, molecular wires, etc) will determine to large extent regulatory and public acceptance of Nanotechnology.  Since 2000, I have been leading the development and implementation of a collaborative research program in Nanoscale Environmental Science and Technology (NEST) between (i) the Materials and Process Simulation Center of the Beckman Institute of the California Institute of Technology and (ii) the Department of Civil Engineering at Howard University.  This program is currently funded through grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Water Research Institute.  The overall objectives of our NEST research program are to:

1. Characterize the structures and functions of environmentally relevant abiotic/biotic macromolecules, nanoparticles and colloids;
2. Develop and evaluate functional nanomaterials for treatment of water contaminated by mixtures of organic/inorganic pollutants,         radionuclides and biological contaminants; and 
3. Develop and validate quantitative tools for assessing the fate, transport and toxicity of nanomaterials.

 

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  • Robert Langer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Research Interests
    A major focus of Professor Langer's research is the study and development of polymers to deliver drugs, particularly genetically engineered proteins and DNA, continuously at controlled rates for prolonged periods of time. Work is in progress in the following areas:
    Investigating the mechanism of release from polymeric delivery systems with concomitant microstructural analysis and mathematical modeling.
    Studying applications of these systems including the development of effective long-term delivery systems for insulin, anti-cancer drugs, growth factors, gene therapy agents and vaccines.
    Developing controlled release systems that can be magnetically, ultrasonically, or enzymatically triggered to increase release rates.
    Synthesizing new biodegradable polymeric delivery systems which will ultimately be absorbed by the body.
    Creating new approaches for delivering drugs such as proteins and genes across complex barriers in the body such as the blood-brain barrier, the intestine, the lung and the skin.

 

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  Mark Lundstrom, Purdue U.
 

Mark Lundstrom is the Don and Carol Scifres Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Purdue University where he teaches and performs research on the physics, technology, and simulation of electronic devices. Lundstrom is the founding director of the NSF-funded Network for Computational Nanotechnology, which has a mission of research, education, leadership, and service to the nation’s National Nanotechnology Initiative. He serves on the leadership councils of the NASA-funded Institute for Nanoelectronics and Computing and the MARCO Focus Center for Materials, Structures, and Devices. Lundstrom’s work has been recognized by several awards, most recently the 2005 US Semiconductor Industry Association’s University Research Award for his career contributions to the physics and modeling of semiconductor devices.


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  James Murday, University of Southern California
 

James Murday is associate director for physical sciences of the USC Washington, DC Office of Research Advancement.

 

Prior to USC, Murday’s career at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) included leading the Surface Chemistry programs (1975-1987) and the Chemistry Division (1988-2006, when he retired from Federal service).

 

Additional responsibilities included tenures as Director of Research for the Department of Defense, Research and Engineering; Chief Scientist, Office of Naval Research; Director, National Nanotechnology Coordination Office; and Executive Secretary to the U.S. National Science and Technology Council’s Subcommittee on Nanometer Science Engineering and Technology (NSET).

 

He holds a PhD in experimental solid state physics from Cornell in 1970 and a B.S. in physics from Case Institute of Technology in 1964. His research interests have spanned nuclear magnetic resonance, surface science, and nanoscale science and technology. He has published over 100 papers and reports on those topics. He is a member of the ACS, APS, MRS, and AVS professional societies.


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  James L. Olds, George Mason U.
 

Research Interests
Dr. Olds interests focuses on the functional role of the mammalian neocortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, in health and disease, with special emphasis on how these highly ordered neuroanatomical regions interact to store and retrieve complex memories (ranging from face recognition to motor programs)
Dr. Olds also especiallices in federal funding of biomedical research in the United States and around the world. Over the past decade, He have worked with other concerned policymakers to ensure that biomedical research appropriations from Congress are adequate to support America’s expanding public health needs and to support emerging medical technologies.


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  Robert G. Urban, Massachussetts Institute of Technology.
 

Research Interests
Dr. Urban is Executive Director of MIT's new David Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. Prior to his current position, he was CEO of Acretia, a privately held drug-development company based in Boston.


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  H. S. Philip Wong, Stanford U.
 

Research Interests
Profesor Wong's interests are in nanoscale science and technology, semiconductor technology, solid state devices, and electronic imaging. He is interested in exploring new materials, novel fabrication techniques, and novel device concepts for future nanoelectronic systems. Novel devices often enable new concepts in circuit and system designs. His research also includes explorations into circuits and systems that are device-driven. His present research covers a broad range of topics including carbon nanotubes, semiconductor nanowires, self-assembly, exploratory logic devices, nanoelectromechanical devices, novel memory devices, and biosensors.


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Reviewers



  Dawn Bonnell Dawn Bonnell, University of Pennsylvania

Dawn Bonnell explores the fundamental basis of property variations at atomic scales in complex materials, exploiting these variations to make functional systems. The Bonnell Group images and manipulates atoms and molecules using scanning probes, and develops new tools for examining behavior at these scales. Dawn and her group induce local property variations to be used as templates in patterning complex nanostructures, such as nanoelectronic and opto electronic devices, and they analyze compound nanostructures, consisting of ferroelectric compounds, synthetic proteins, and nano dots.

 

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  J. Tinsley Oden, U. of Texas at Austin
 

Research Interests
Dr. Oden research focuses on contemporary topics in computational engineering and mathematics, including a posteriori error estimation, model adaptivity, multi-scale modeling, verification and validation of computer simulations, uncertainty quantification and adaptive control. Applications of current interest include molecular dynamics, continuum-quantum mechanics, modeling of semi-conductor manufacturing processes, and dynamic data-driven simulation systems for control of laser treatment of cancer.


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Other Contributors



  Dave Rejeski, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
 

Mr. Rejeski directs the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies at the Woodrow Wilson Center, where he is also Director of the Foresight and Governance Project. His prior experience includes serving as a Visiting Fellow at Yale University’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and as an EPA representative to the White House Council on Environmental Quality, working in the White House Office of Science and Technology, and heading the Future Studies Unit at the Environmental Protection Agency. He has also worked in Germany and founded a non-profit focusing on conservation and renewable energy technologies. Mr. Rejeski has written extensively on science, technology, and policy issues, and is the co-editor of a recent book on environmentalism and future technologies. He serves on the EPA’s Science Advisory Board and on advisory boards for numerous organizations, including the Greening of Industry Network, the Journal of Industrial Ecology, and the University of Michigan’s Corporate Environmental Management Program, and the European External Advisory Board of Nanologue. He has an M.P.A. from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and an M.E.D. from the Yale University School of Architecture.


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